FACULTY UPDATE: DR. CHRISTOPHER KEVIN WONG PRESENTS AWARD-WINNING RESEARCH AT APTA NEXT AND WORLD CONGRESS OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF PROSTHETISTS AND ORTHOTISTS

Posted by vanessa on August 28, 2017

Dr. Christopher Kevin Wong

PT program faculty member and associate director Dr. Christopher Kevin Wong presented two posters at the 2017 APTA NEXT Conference in Boston in June. The first was a validation of an amputation-adjusted body mass index (BMI) calculator. Amputation-adjusted BMI does not correlate with prosthetic function but does provide a more accurate measure of body mass index that people can use to make weight-related health decisions such as dieting. The findings were published by the American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in July, 2017. Link: Wong CK, Wong RJ. Standard and amputation-adjusted body mass index and measures: comparison and relevance to functional measures, weight-related comorbidities, and dieting. Am J Phys Med Rehabil, 2017:96(x):in press. Epub July 7, 2017. doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000796. or PMID: 28692486)

The second explored phantom limb pain and limb laterality recognition—a component of graded motor imagery, which is used to treat chronic pain. Laterality recognition scores for accuracy or speed have not correlated well with pain measures in people with stroke, complex regional pain syndrome, or phantom limb pain. This study found that dividing accuracy by speed of laterality recognition—such that the best score reflects the greatest accuracy in the shortest time—reliably correlated with phantom limb pain measures. The poster received a 2017 NEXT Research Abstract Special Recognition award; the findings will appear this year in Pain Medicine. Dr. Wong has expanded this study to determine if improving laterality recognition will decrease phantom limb pain. Link: Wong CK, Wong CK. Limb laterality recognition score: a reliable clinical measure related to phantom limb pain. Pain Med, 2017:in press. Epub Aug 24, 2017. doi: 10.1093/pm/pnx179 

Dr. Wong also presented research this summer at the 2017 World Congress of the International Society of Prosthetists and Orthotists (ISPO) in Cape Town, South Africa. His work validated an earlier predictive model for fall-related injury among people with lower limb loss, developed in New York, using hundreds of subjects from an 11-state sample from the Eastern half of the United States. People of non-white race are nearly 5 times more likely to suffer fall-related injury requiring medical care than their white counterparts. Women with vascular amputations and transtibial amputations are more than 2 times more likely to be injured than men with traumatic and transfemoral amputations. This research was funded by the Center for Disease Control through the CUMC Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention and has been submitted for publication with the collaboration of Stan Chihuri, MS, Mailman School of Public Health.  


 

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